Found 0 - 2 results of 2 programs matching keyword " mineral"


Science in the City:  Black Sand (Clip)
Running Time:
00:03:53
Join Exploratorium educator Ken Finn as he unlocks the mystery behind the black sand (a.k.a. magnetite) at Ocean Beach. This piece explores the origin of magnetite in the Sierra Nevada mountains, its journey down the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers to the Bay, and the interesting physical properties of this mineral, plus some fun things you can do with it.

Project: Science in the City | Browse All

Date: August 9, 2011
Format: Expedition
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): General Science

Keywords: black sand, beach, magnitite, magnet, mineral, magnetic lines, force fields, exploratorium, ocean beach, exhibit


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Try This!:  Try This! With Paul Doherty and Friends: Gorazd Planinsic (Webcast)
Running Time:
00:16:58
Dr. Paul Doherty scours the globe for the world's greatest science demonstrations. Here he partners with Dr. Gorazd Planinsic, frequent contributor to Physics Teacher magazine, active in international physics education, and illustrator of physics text books. Watch this webcast, follow the links to the 'recipes,' then try it yourself!

Project: Try This! With Paul Doherty and Friends | Browse All

Date: March 8, 2001
Format: Demonstration / Activity
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): General Science

Keywords: color, light and color, ping pong ball, film can, film cannister, colored leds, mixing colors, led light activity, mixing colors to make white light, density column, mineral oil, soda bottle, cartesian diver snack, descartes diver activity, bouyancy, air pressure, liqu


Real: 256K  
 
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
Webcasts made possible through the generosity of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, The Jim Clark Endowment for Internet Education, the McBean Family Foundation,.and the Corporation for Educational Networks Initiatives in California (CENIC).

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