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00:22:00
Recorded live at the Exploratorium 2015 An element for the modern age, lightweight lithium is commonly used in rechargeable batteries, fireworks, and medications for treating bipolar disorder. Lithium is highly reactive, and has served as a fuel source for nuclear weapons as well as a cooling agent in nuclear reactors. See its scarlet contributions to pyrotechnics, and discuss its divided reputation as being both restorative and potentially toxic to our health.

00:25:00
Recorded live at the Exploratorium 2015 In a recent study by the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Dr. Julie Andersen found that low doses of lithium prevented Parkinson's symptoms in aged mice with a human mutation for the disease. Join Dr. Andersen to learn more about her research, and lithium’s potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

00:14:00
Recorded live at the Exploratorium 2015 Zeke Kossover is a Teacher-in-Residence at the Exploratorium Teacher Institute, where he trains and supports coaches and mentors who work with novice science teachers in the classroom. For fun, he puts on physics circus shows that work as magic shows in reverse--making confusing things easy to understand.

00:24:55
Recorded live at the Exploratorium 2015 Plumb the dark and dangerous worlds of commercial diving and marine construction with Thomas Belcher, President of Underwater Resources, Inc., and learn how helium enables deep-sea divers to safely breathe under pressure.

00:19:43
Recorded live at the Exploratorium 2015 Helium is the second most abundant element in the universe. Then why is there a global helium shortage? Follow the trail of our spendthrift affair with this elusive noble gas, and find out why its future remains up in the air. Learn about helium’s many uses, from cooling magnets in MRI machines to enabling deep-sea divers to safely breathe under pressure.

00:25:23
Featuring: A People's History of the Periodic Table with Paul Stepahin

00:30:00
Is there a constitutional right to “physician-assisted suicide”? What about a “dignified death”—and what is a dignified death? Should terminally ill patients facing mental incapacitation or unbearable pain have access to fatal ingestion—also known as physician aid in dying? Or would that jeopardize our society’s progress toward more compassionate, comfort-based care?

00:30:00
Susie Ibarra is known for her innovative style and cultural dialogue as a composer, improviser, percussionist, and humanitarian. She is interested in the intersection of traditional and avant-garde styles and how this informs and inspires interdisciplinary art, education, and public service. Most recently, Ibarra’s composition and improvisation work has blended traditions, rhythms, and tunings from musical cultures across the globe.

00:23:00
Join Sarah Cahill for a interview with avant-garde percussionist Susie Ibarra.

00:09:00
Buried in a cove that later became downtown San Francisco, a Gold Rush-era cargo ship lay lost and forgotten underground until it was exposed by construction in 2013. Marine archeologists and historians share stories of the discovery, excavation, and preservation of this humble yet significant 23-foot maritime artifact, unique among the oldest intact boats in the United States.