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05:12:09
On November 8, 2006, Mercury slowly slid across the face of the sun during a relatively rare event known as a transit. The Exploratorium's Live@ crew was at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona to cover the event. This webcast includes a brief history of Kitt Peak and its 21 telescopes.

00:41:18
In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity from a special secret ingredient. This week: mirrors!

00:58:32
Watch ancient text revealed and read for the first time in a thousand years! Archimedes was one of the world's greatest scientific and mathematical minds. His thoughts were inscribed on goatskin parchment, but the letters and diagrams were scraped off and written over by Greek monks in the Middle Ages. Now, using an intense x-ray beam generated at Stanford University's linear accelerator, some of the original Greek text will be revealed for the first time in the modern world.

1:04:26
In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity from a special secret ingredient. This week: rocks!

01:05:00
In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity from a special secret ingredient. This week-fruit!

01:01:49
In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity from a special secret ingredient. This week: crayons!

1:02:09
In this zany competition teachers have ten minutes to create a science activity from a special secret ingredient. This week: iron!

00:48:31
A century after publication of Einstein's famous papers on light and relativity, this most celebrated of Nobel Laureates will be the subject of a talk by award-winning science writer K.C. Cole. She'll discuss the ways in which Einstein continues to influence physics today, from detecting gravity waves to understanding string theory.

1:16:37
On March 29, 2006, a total solar eclipse occurred as the moon moved directly between the earth and the sun. The moon's shadow fell on the earth, first darkening the eastern tip of Brazil, and then moved across the Atlantic Ocean to make landfall in Ghana, Africa. It continued moving northeast through Nigeria, Niger, Libya, Egypt, across the Mediterranean and into Turkey, where an Exploratorium team was waiting.

2:53:54
A telescope-only view of the 2006 eclipse, as seen from Turkey.