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00:23:04
Join Dr. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, an authority on positive psychology and flow, for a lecture on creativity. Dr. Csikszentmihalyi reviews the common traits of creative people and describe the environments that foster innovation.

00:21:12
Join us as UC Berkeley's Dr. Robert Levenson interviews acclaimed psychologist Dr. Paul Ekman about his 40 years of research into the universality of human facial expressions. The talk includes photographs and never-before-seen footage from Dr. Ekman's fieldwork among the Fore, an isolated New Guinea tribe he first visited in the early 1960s.

00:22:40
They say that love makes the world go around--but love can make you loco, too. This compelling audio documentary weaves together obsessions, confessions, and reflections to explore the universal madness of love.

00:18:23
Author and animal scientist Dr. Grandin shares her insights on ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), visual thinking, and human and animal minds. Dr. Grandin, herself autistic, believes the autistic person's capacity to "see the actual things themselves" places autistic individuals in a unique position to understand the ways animals think.

00:03:19
The POLENET project installed their newest high-precision GPS system on Deverall Island, Antarctica. These GPS systems tell scientists how much the ground underneath the ice sheet is moving upward. This has important implications on the movement of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and its interplay with the rock below. Learn more about it in this audio report from correspondent Kelly Carroll.

00:02:58
In this audio dispatch, correspondent Jack Walter describes his first week at the team's field camp on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Hear about their research on lakes under the glaciers and get a slice of life as a remote polar scientist.

00:03:56
In this audio dispatch, correspondent Saffia Hossainzadeh describes her journey to her team's deep field site via a stop at Siple Dome station. In part one, hear about the difficulties involved in escorting 700 pounds of explosives through Antarctica.

00:02:27
In this audio dispatch, correspondent Saffia Hossainzadeh describes her journey to her team's deep field site via a stop at Siple Dome station. In part two, hear about our combat-style landing at Siple Dome’s remote air strip.

00:24:49
An interview with Mel Zucker, Professor of Geology, Skyline College, San Bruno, California.

In the early 1900s, German meteorologist Alfred Wegener suggested that the earth's continents were once a single landmass that had somehow split into pieces, drifting their separate ways. Geologists the world over called his idea preposterous. Decades later, their ridicule shifted to admiration as new tools developed by the military to map the ocean floors revealed the engine that drives the continents' movement. Geology professor Mel Zucker tells the story of this brilliant earth scientist and how, long after his death, science finally caught up with Wegener's crazy idea.

00:11:17
An interview with science historian Richard Carrier.

It's not enough to know that a nutcracker works; a scientist needs to know why. Historian Richard Carrier recounts how, in ancient Greece, pondering the nutcracker led to the physics of levers. He describes how Aristotle and others shaped the beginnings of Western scientific thought: the notion that knowledge of the natural world relies on being able to question, test, reproduce and improve the accuracy of what's believed to be true. He explains why he sees science as a practice rooted in values, how it protects us from our own erroneous tendencies, and why questioning authority helps foster scientific thinking.