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00:04:50
For two days Summit Camp, Greenland experienced strong winds and blowing snow, making work, and even walking around camp, difficult.

00:03:18
Dr. Bart Kempenaers, a behavioral ecologist from the Max Planck Institiute of Ornithology in Seewiesen, Germany, and his team fashion fake Sandpiper eggs, swap them for the real ones in the nest and incubate them in their lab at BASC’s (Barrow Arctic Science Consortium) new research facility. Once the hatchlings emerge, they take samples from them to determine factors such as paternity. The chicks are then returned to the nest, without the mother batting a feather.

00:03:08
What does a ringed seal’s breathing hole look like and how do you find one on a vast sheet of sea ice? Dr. Brendan Kelly uses the canine skills of Cooper, a Black Labrador he trained to chase the scent of ringed seals and point to their holes. Passionate about wildlife and climate change, Melanie Duchin has loaned her dog to work with Brendan for the past 5 years.

00:02:32
Watch Dr. Brendan Kelly, Micaela Ponce, Kevin Bakker and Dan Carlson as they measure and tag a female ringed seal on the frozen Chukchi Sea. Follow them as they return the seal by snowmobile to her breathing hole in the Elson Lagoon - and get a little seal slap in the process.

00:01:48
To get to Greenland, scientists fly with the 109th Air National Guard in a Hercules C-130 aircraft. It is definitely not your typical airline experience.

6:50
How do cancer cells misbehave? Watch and listen as cancer researcher Dr. Thea Tlsty explains how genetic blips turn cancer cells into the rogues they are.

5:49
From fertilization to pregnancy tests, watch and listen as Xenopus researcher Dr. Thierry Brassac shows how these creatures, with their enormous eggs cells and their acts of metamorphosis, have been helping scientists for centuries.

6:48
The water-dwelling planaria can lose its head and regrow a new one. Watch and listen as planaria researcher Alejandro Sanchez Alvarado explains how a little flatworm's might teach us about our own regenerative potential.

00:02:52
At the National Ice Core Lab in Denver, Colorado, scientists study ice cores in a Class 100 clean room lab kept at minus 7 degrees F.

00:00:54
The Jakobshavn Isbræ is among the fastest-moving glaciers in the world. The Jakobshavn is an outlet glacier, one of the few places where the giant Greenland ice sheet can shed ice in the form of gigantic icebergs. This timelapse video (100x real speed) from glaciologist Mark Fahnestock shows one of these massive calving events. Notice the dark blue ice that surfaces when the iceberg flips over in the ice-choked Ilulissat icefjord. Time interval on this timelapse is 10 seconds per frame.