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00:01:00
Primatologist Josep Call explains why it would be interesting to know whether primates can remember and repay favors.

00:01:36
Psychologist Felix Warneken explains the importance of observing chimp behavior both in the wild and in controlled experimental environments.

00:01:30
Primatologist Christophe Boesch demonstrates and discusses a hive raiding, an aspect of chimpanzee behavior.

00:24:49
An interview with Mel Zucker, Professor of Geology, Skyline College, San Bruno, California.

In the early 1900s, German meteorologist Alfred Wegener suggested that the earth's continents were once a single landmass that had somehow split into pieces, drifting their separate ways. Geologists the world over called his idea preposterous. Decades later, their ridicule shifted to admiration as new tools developed by the military to map the ocean floors revealed the engine that drives the continents' movement. Geology professor Mel Zucker tells the story of this brilliant earth scientist and how, long after his death, science finally caught up with Wegener's crazy idea.

00:11:17
An interview with science historian Richard Carrier.

It's not enough to know that a nutcracker works; a scientist needs to know why. Historian Richard Carrier recounts how, in ancient Greece, pondering the nutcracker led to the physics of levers. He describes how Aristotle and others shaped the beginnings of Western scientific thought: the notion that knowledge of the natural world relies on being able to question, test, reproduce and improve the accuracy of what's believed to be true. He explains why he sees science as a practice rooted in values, how it protects us from our own erroneous tendencies, and why questioning authority helps foster scientific thinking.

00:02:08
Penn State University glaciologist Dr. Richard Alley explains why ice is cool.

00:03:24
What is dark energy? Cosmologist Rocky Kolb explains how the South Pole Telescope will help us understand the properties and nature of this mysterious force.

00:02:51
Christina, a geologist from Stanford University, investigates climate history by scouring sediment samples for diatoms, microscopic marine creatures that lived long ago in Antarctica's McMurdo Sound.

00:02:16
Nadine, a glaciology graduate student from UC Santa Cruz, spent four weeks on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet investigating ice sheets and global climate change.

00:03:09
Dr. Tulaczyk, a glaciologist from UC Santa Cruz, studies the lakes, floods, and ice quakes that occur under the giant glaciers of Antarctica. He is among only 200 scientists world-wide who study ice sheet dynamics and its role in climate change.