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00:25:13
Have you ever wondered exactly what clouds are made of, or what the difference is between a cumulus and lenticular cloud? Clouds are an ever-present, ever-changing part of our natural landscape. They come in a huge variety of shapes and sizes, and capture our imagination with their endless permutations. Join Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty for a live Webcast about cloud physics. Paul will discuss the basic makeup of clouds, and explore some of the aspects that make them such a rich part of our daily lives.

00:08:39
Geeks have strange hobbies. Staff physicist Paul Doherty plays the corrugated plastic tube, also known as a “whirly,” and explains the surprising science behind the sound.

00:08:42
Exploratorium graphic artist David Barker describes the physics of baseball bats, and makes some sweet music in the process!

00:03:50
A mouse's eye view of the main floor of the Exploratorium. Filmed at the Palace of Fine Arts location in January 2010.

00:08:12
Staff educator Modesto Tamez tells how he gets students exploring electromagnets, a great preparation for making an electric motor.

00:09:32
TI staff educator Eric Muller explains how to make your own record player!

00:09:26
It can be hard to make ideas about size and scale relevant to students’ lives. Children’s book author David Schwartz explains a series of neat real-world comparisons from his book that really get the concepts across.

00:07:31
Which is farthest away from the earth, the stars or Pluto? The answer may be obvious to you, but a lot of people get this wrong. Listen to TI director Linda Shore as she presents a little survey about how things are arranged in the heavens—and explains what the surprising results mean.

Most things won't burn on Mars—after all, the main ingredient in the Martian atmosphere, carbon dioxide, is used in fire extinguishers on earth. So how would one create fire without oxygen? Use metal!This slow motion footage shows magnesium burning within a block of dry ice.

00:09:39
Exploratorium staff physicist Thomas Humphrey divulges a clever way to measure the speed of sound, and he explains how he’s used that information to measure things in the world.