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00:04:52
Newton wasn’t really ready to believe that light was a wave, and so he didn’t see what was in front of his eyes. Staff physicist Paul Doherty tells how to do the same experiment that Newton did back in the 1650s to see the wave nature of light.

01:23:00
In this gem from 1990, we get a brief peek into the flourishing mind of German-born composer/sculptor Trimpin, a MacArthur "genius" award winner and the subject of a recent feature documentary. He chronicles his unique adventures through sound and music making, takes audience questions, and stages modified versions of his musical installations in front of the live audience.

00:03:57
For three days in February 2010, the Exploratorium showcased the innovations and outlaw aesthetics of custom computer culture. An outgrowth of the hacker community, personal computer modding was born from the need for speed and personal style.

00:10:10
Put kids’ skepticism to work! Children’s book author David Schwartz explains how a class disagreed with the numbers in one of his math books, and set out to prove him wrong!

00:04:40
Exploratorium staff educator Don Rathjen makes some noise with this activity about Newton’s laws.

00:00:46
Celebrate Pi Day— an international holiday born at San Francisco’s Exploratorium. Join us for a live webcast where we examine the nature of everyone's favorite mathmatical constant, 3.1415926535…ad infinitum!

00:01:54
The Exploratorium TV crew caught up with Exploratorium Living Systems director, Dr. Kristina Yu, at After Dark: Sexplorations. Kristina confirmed it for us—sex is all around us, all the time.

00:03:15
This short video summarizes all of the steps in collecting an ice core using the Deep Ice Sheet Coring (DISC) drill. Thomas Bauska, of Oregon State University helped Heidi Roop put together this video.

00:05:20
Exploratorium staff physicist Thomas Humphrey explains what temperature and color have to do with one another.

00:10:24
Exploratorium staff member Earl Stirling demonstrates the amazing "Pyrograph", an artwork refined over four years. Like a fiery version of the museum’s classic Drawing Board, Stirling’s "Pyrograph" swings a pendulum over a sandy cauldron, tracing out oscillating patterns in colorful fire. This mesmerizing piece evokes both the Foucault pendulum and Dante’s Inferno.