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00:32:56
Nathalie Cabrol, Planetary Scientist, Principal Investigator at NASA Ames Research Center and the SETI Institute, looks for Mars analogs in extreme environments on Earth. She found one at the world’s highest lake at Chile’s Licancabur volcano, site of a unique analog to ancient Martian lakes. We chat with Dr. Cabrol as she investigates the life forms at Licancabur.

00:33:44
In this archived program from 2003, join us for a conversation with Pulitzer-prize winning biologist E. O. Wilson, who introduced the term biodiversity to describe the interlocking dependence and diversity of organisms in sustaining life in biological communities.

00:22:30
Dr. Eric Lander, a leading figure in the Human Genome Project and director of the Whitehead Institute Center for Genome Research, tells us about the recently completed mouse genome and how the study of other genomes gives key information about human genetics and evolution.

12:28:42
Dr. James Watson is the President of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and the co-discoverer of the double helix, for which he won a Nobel prize in physiology or medicine in 1962. Dr. Watson was also the first director of the Human Genome Project. He talks with us about early discoveries in molecular biology, the Human Genome Project, and what makes Cold Spring Harbor a unique scientific institution.

00:20:25
Dr. Francis Collins is the Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, which is responsible for coordinating the government-sponsored effort to map and sequence the entire human genome, considered by many as one of the most important scientific undertakings of our time. Dr. Collins is a physician and geneticist whose own work led to the identification of the genes for cystic fibrosis, neurofibromatosis, and Huntington's disease. In this Webcast, Dr. Collins explains the different strategies for finding disease genes, the competition between public and private efforts to decode the human genome, and the next steps for the Human Genome Project, now that the first accurate gene maps have been created.

0:28:42
Dr. James Watson is the President of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and the codiscoverer of the double helix, for which he won a Nobel prize in physiology or medicine in 1962. Dr. Watson was also the first director of the Human Genome Project. He talks with us about early discoveries in molecular biology, the Human Genome Project, and what makes Cold Spring Harbor a unique scientific institution.

00:18:34
Dr. Carol Greider is a professor of molecular biology and genetics at Johns Hopkins University. She worked with molecular biologist Elizabeth Blackburn to discover the role of telomeres—segments of DNA that protect and stabilize the ends of chromosomes. Dr. Greider tells us about her work and shares her thoughts about the importance of mentors for women in science.

00:26:05
Dr. Bruce Stillman is the Director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a position he inherited from James Watson in 1994. He continues his own research at the lab on DNA replication. In this program, Dr. Stillman describes the unique culture of science at CSHL, explores future directions of research, and tells us what he learned as an administrator for Dr. Watson.

00:25:57
Dr. Walter Gilbert, a physicist who turned to molecular biology in 1960, won the Nobel prize in chemistry in 1980 for determining the base sequences of DNA. His recent research has concentrated on the structure of genes and the evolution of DNA sequences. In this Webcast, Dr Gilbert tells us how physicists have helped drive discoveries in molecular biology, and the relationship between private and university research efforts.

00:24:51
Dr. Sydney Brenner won the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine in 2002 for his work with the tiny nematode, C. elegans. Dr. Brenner recruited the one-millimeter worm in the early sixties as the ideal model organism to study cell differentiation and organ development. In this program, he describes how new model organisms are established for studying basic physiology, recounts his reaction to seeing Watson and Crick's DNA model for the first time, and offers advice to young scientists just starting out.