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00:30:00
Tardigrades are amazing creatures that can withstand the most extreme conditions on Earth, as well as the vacuum of space! This unique and charismatic animal has the ability to survive in a variety of situations. In today's program, Exploratorium scientist Karen Kalumuck will continue our programming about life in extreme environments as it relates to the search for 'habitability' on Mars.

00:30:00
Why is water, or evidence of water, so important to the Mars missions? Join Exploratorium scientists Ron Hipschman and Karen Kalumuck as they examine water as one of the building blocks for life and what previous Mars missions have discovered about water on the red planet.

00:03:18
Join the Exploratorium crew on a visit to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where we will learn more about the ecological impact of plastic debris in the North Pacific Gyre. To learn more about marine debris visit: http://www.exploratorium.edu/tv/index.php?project=110&program=1301&type=clip

00:01:33
Weather plays a large role in sailing! Join us as we pay a visit to the National Weather Service station in San Diego to catch a glimpse into the future weather patterns that will effect the America's Cup Races.

04:55
There are green sea turtles in San Diego Bay? Where did they come from? Do they really live over 100 years? Why is it important for scientists to keep track of these giant creatures, and how on earth do they do it? In this interview with ecologist Tomoharu Eguchi (NOAA Marine Fisheries Service) and ecology graduate student Sheila Madrak, we meet the sea turtles and explore these 'big' questions.

02:50
The Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (http://sccoos.org/) gathers live data about winds, waves, surface currents, temperature, and water quality, and makes it available to everyone. In this piece, Oceanographer Art Miller tells us about this system, and about how America's Cup sailors can use this kind of data and modeling to improve their race performances. To access wind modeling data, visit: http://www.sccoos.org/data/observations/

04:53
How can a wind-powered sailboat move faster than the wind? Why do the America's Cup sails look like airplane wings? With the beginner in mind, Exploratorium senior scientist Paul Doherty introduces the basic physics of sailing and sail design.

00:01:44
Take a look at the construction at Piers 15 and 17 from a different vantage point. This past August we recorded video of the Exploratorium's new home from a boat about 100 yards off the back of the piers.

00:03:20
We went and talked with the folks who ran the Microzoo camp at Burning Man 2010, and learned about critters in extreme environments.

00:01:27
Would you drink from a water fountain fashioned from an actual (but unused!) toilet? Watch museum visitors experience the tension between reason and emotion while playing with this unusual Mind area exhibit, aptly named "Sip of Conflict."