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Join us for an intriguing evening of discussion about climate change and technology. The French-American Climate Talks (FACTS) is a conference series organized by the Embassy of France in the United States, and the Exploratorium is proud to host the San Francisco chapter. Don't miss this opportunity to see renowned scientists, prominent industry figures, and top entrepreneurs gather.

The drinking water provided for San Francisco and many nearby communities is among the purest in the world. Located high in the Sierras, more than 200 miles away, Hetch Hetchy reservoir holds most of this water which is fed by springtime snowmelt via the Tuolumne River. The system for delivering that water is almost entirely gravity fed, requiring almost no fossil fuel consumption to move water from the mountains to the tap. Take an exclusive tour with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) as they lead us through this unique system and address the current drought and how to conserve water.

Immerse yourself in visual storytelling that extends the possibilities of cinema. See aspects of film rarely displayed: unusual film formats with Dino Everett and an insider view into projectionists’ techniques with Paul Clipson. Enter worlds created by Elise Baldwin—investigating collective memory—and by Wet Gate, a 16mm projector–playing ensemble. Experience Thad Povey and Mark Taylor’s multiturntable record player, the realization of their near-identical dreams, and Tooth’s multiprojector dreamscape installation. Play with the Eunoics Light Club as they summon seemingly living forms using lenses, filters, and mirrors. Debate the merits of short films with Brian Darr and make your own cinematic toys and sound effects. Finally, make your exploration of film not just figurative but literal by seeking—and finding—four films shown in the museum’s out-of-the-way corners.

Exploratorium Global Studios worked with TÜBITAK, the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey, to plan, design, and support implementation of the Kocaeli Science Center (KSC) located in the historically significant SEKA Factory site, approximately 100 km southeast of Istanbul. In addition to completing the master plan for this new science center, Global Studios provided architectural review, detailed environmental and exhibit design, and fabrication oversight. The completed design package included 200 exhibits in 3 main galleries and an outdoor area. Global Studios also provided a series of professional training and program development workshops for KSC staff in Turkey and on the Exploratorium campus in San Francisco.

Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off, where teachers compete before a live webcast audience for the sought-after title, "Iron Science Teacher."

Height confers advantages in many sports—to a point. But what if you’re too tall to even safely fit on a bicycle? Bike builder David Folch shares both the engineering challenges and the joy of creating supersized bikes for supersized riders.

Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off, where teachers compete before a live webcast audience for the sought-after title, "Iron Science Teacher."

The Science of Sharing Forum on June 6, 2015 featured Dr. Shachar Kariv, Benjamin N. Ward Professor of Economics and Economics Department Chair at UC Berkeley. He has been a visiting scholar at Stanford University, the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton, the European University Institute, the University of Oxford, and the Norwegian School of Economics. Much of his research focuses on social networks, behavior under uncertainty, and decisions about sharing and giving.

Emerging from inside of stars, carbon is the fourth most abundant element in the universe, and the basis for all life on Earth. Polyamorous, it loves to bond, exchanging four of its electrons with atoms of itself and other elements to create an endless variety of chemistry, from DNA chains to soccer-ball shaped fullerenes to atom-thick sheets of graphene. As diamond, carbon is hard and abrasive, as graphite, soft. When its bonds are broken, carbon readily moves from one partner to the next, cycling between oceans, atmosphere, flora, fauna, soil, rocks, and fossil deposits deep below ground.

Join us on the web or in person for a live chat with scientists and educators on board the Exploration Vessel Nautilus.