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San Francisco International Children's Film Festival - November 2012

For Immediate Release:
October 05, 2012

Media Available
Contact:
Jenny Slafkosky (415) 528-4367
images@exploratorium.edu

San Francisco International Children's Film Festival - November 2012

San Francisco International Children’s Film Festival
presented by The New York International Children's Film Festival and The Exploratorium
November 9, 10 and 11, 2012
Exploratorium’s McBean Theater

[caption id="attachment_6798" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Still from short, animated film "Balloon Moon" Courtesy of the NYICFF"]Still from short, animated film "Balloon Moon"[/caption]

The Exploratorium and The New York International Children’s Film Festival are pleased to present The San Francisco International Children's Film Festival, screening in the Exploratorium's McBean Theater on Friday, November 9, Saturday, November 10 and Sunday, November 11, 2012. The NYICFF was founded in 1997 to promote intelligent, passionate, provocative cinematic works for young people ages 3-18 years, and to help define a more compelling film for kids. Since its launch, the event has grown to become the largest festival for children and teens in North America. Each year the festival presents 100 animated, live action and experimental shorts and features from around the world.  For information on purchasing tickets, and further details on the films in the festival, go to: www.gkids.com/sf2012

The festival program is as follows:

Friday, November 9
10:30 am - Kid Flix Mix
12:30 pm - Monster in Paris
3 pm  - The Painting
5 pm  - Party Mix

Saturday, November 10
11 am  - Magic Piano
1 pm  - Toys in the Attic
3 pm – Salaam Dunk
5 pm – Letter to Momo

Sunday, November 11
11 am – Kid Flix Mix
1 pm – Magic Piano
3 pm – Monster in Paris
5 pm – Party Mix

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Program details are as follows:

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th


Kid Flix Mix
When: Friday, November 9th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater

Cost: Free with Museum admission
Showtime 10:30 am

Enjoy a colorful collection of short films from around the world, hand-picked as audience and jury favorites from the 2012 New York Int’l Children’s Film Festival.  Recommended for ages 4 up. Total runtime, 60 min.  In English or musical/no dialogue. Includes:

B/W Races (Italy, Jacopo Martinoni, 2010, 2.5 min)
A quirky, black and white paper cut-out animation about a car race – in which a rogue black driver who runs others off the track gets his comeuppance. Home-made sound-effects add to the lo-fi fun.

Balloon Moon (Portugal, Jose Miguel Ribeiro, 2010, 5 min)
With sumptuous colors and artful stop motion animation, a cardboard boy and his ladybug friend set sail into a deep blue moonlit sea and have a dream adventure.

Behind (Canada, Ga Young Back, 2011, 3 min)
After a trying and scary day, a little girl feels all alone – until she realizes that her best friend has been with her and taking care of her the whole time.

Diversity (USA, Anthony Dusko, 2010, 1 min)
This instructive cartoon teaches important lessons of life, like how to do the happy dance.

Ernesto (UK, Corinne Ladeinde, 2011, 7 min)
Seven-year-old Ernesto feels left out when he realizes he's the only kid in school who hasn’t lost any baby teeth. Ernesto resorts to drastic measures to get rid of them; his teeth however, have other plans...

The Gruffalo's Child (UK, Animation, Johannes Weiland/Uwe Heidschotter, 2011, 26 min)
One wild and windy night, the Gruffalo's child ignores her father's warning and tiptoes out into the snow in search of the Big Bad Mouse. This follow-up to the Oscar-nominated original is adapted from the enormously popular Gruffalo picture books by British author Julia Donaldson.

Gulp (UK, Animation, Sumo Science, 2011, 2 min)
Aardman Animations and Sumo Science follow up last year’s wonderful diminutive Dot (which set the world record for smallest animated character) by notching it up a few orders of magnitude. Shot on an expansive seaside location, they set a new record for the world’s largest stop motion set, in this story of a fisherman who gets swallowed by a whale.

Keenan at Sea (USA, David Cowles/Jeremy Galante, 2010, 2 min)
This adorable tune from The Girls is the catchy theme song for the festival!

Metro (USA, Jake Wyatt, 2011, 5 min)
A young girl chases a mysterious fox through a secret door and into a subterranean wonderland to retrieve her stolen train ticket.

Twist & Shout (Japan, Yosuke Kihara, 2010, 3 min)
Two cute-as-buttons Japanese puppets travel to Abbey Road to find inspiration and shoot the video for their ukulele cover version of “Twist and Shout.”

Who is Not Sleeping? (Sweden, Jessica Lauren, 2010, 4 min)
Rabbit is sleeping over at Teddy Pig's house. It's going to be lots of fun! They are playing and drinking hot chocolate, but when the lights go out something doesn't feel quite right.


Monster in Paris
When: Friday, November 9th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater

Cost: Free with Museum admission
Showtime 12:30 pm

Paris, 1910. The streets of the city are flooded. A mist-enshrouded Eiffel Tower looms over a temporary lake and the alleyways sport makeshift bridges so Parisians can go about their daily routines. But spirits are high for the citizens of this romantic city, including those of Emile, a lovelorn film projectionist, and his inventor friend Raoul, whose enthusiasm for breaking rules places him and Emile at the center of some unintentional mischief after they sneak into a scientist’s laboratory greenhouse and unwittingly let loose a monster onto the soggy streets of Paris.

Yet this terrible monster turns out to have a sad and sensitive soul – as well as musical talent – and when cabaret singer Lucille discovers the beast hiding backstage at the music hall, he dons a cape and hat and joins her act, instantly wowing the crowd with his silky smooth voice and hot guitar licks. Yet despite his peaceful demeanor, the City of Lights is in a panic, as the rotten rogue of a mayor plunges his police force headlong into a chaotic monster hunt that uses both the sweeping backdrops of Paris and 3D effects to the fullest. Songs by Sean Lennon.

Screens with the short film Keenan at Sea. Total runtime, 94 minutes.  Recommended for ages 7 and up.


The Painting
When: Friday, November 9th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater

Cost: Free with Museum admission
Showtime 3 pm

In this wryly inventive parable, a kingdom is divided into the three castes: the impeccably painted Alldunns who reside in a majestic palace; the Halfies who the Painter has left incomplete; and the untouchable Sketchies, simple charcoal outlines who are banished to the cursed forest. Chastised for her forbidden love for an Alldunn and shamed by her unadorned face, Halfie Claire runs away into the forest. Her beloved Ramo and best friend Lola journey after her, passing between the forbidden Death Flowers that guard the boundaries of the forest (in one of the film’s most radiantly gorgeous scenes), and arriving finally at the very edge of the painting – where they tumble through the canvas and into the Painter’s studio. The abandoned workspace is strewn with paintings, each containing its own animated world – and in a feast for both the eyes and imagination, they explore first one picture and then another, attempting to discover just what the Painter has in mind for all his creations.

Comment: A painted nude in the studio comes to life and becomes a talking character.

Screens with the short film Dripped. Total runtime, 85 min. Recommended for ages 7 and up.

*Note:  Please arrive early to enjoy the Exploratorium prior to the screening.  The Exploratorium closes at 5pm.


Party Mix
When: Friday, November 9th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater
Cost:
Free with Museum admission
Showtime 5 pm

The New York Int’l Children’s Film Festival presents a collection of hilarious, heartfelt and beautiful short films around the world including festival award-winners and audience favorites. Total runtime, 65 min. Recommended for ages 8 and up.

*Note:  Please arrive early to enjoy the Exploratorium prior to the screening.  The Exploratorium closes at 5pm; exhibits will not be available following the screening.

The Dancer (USA, Seth Stark, 2011, 11 min)
Beautiful village and pastoral scenery and quick-cut montages revel in the bustling colors, sounds, tastes, and textures of India, in this true story of an orphan’s indomitable spirit and joyfulness prevailing against all odds.

Dawn (Canada, Jean-François Proulx, 2010, 1.5 min)
When a bump in the road causes an unexpected chain of events, a truck driver’s life flashes before his eyes.

Dripped (France, Leo Verrier, 2010, 9 min)
A fantastic imagining of how Jackson Pollack came upon his “drip” and action-painting style: through devouring (literally) all the styles of the modern past.

Extinction of the Sabertooth House Cat (USA, Damon Wong, 2010, 3.5 min)
This hard-hitting documentary reveals startling new evidence to detail the dramatic last moments of one of Earth’s littlest known creatures.

The Girl and the Fox (USA, Tyler J. Kupferer, 2011, 5.5 min)
An enemy becomes a friend as a young girl has a life-and-death encounter with a snow fox at dusk in the frozen forest.

Hello, I Like You (USA, Mixtape Clup, 2011, 2 min)
This quick-cut musical montage plays with texture, shape, pattern, and movement – with rope, leaves, nuts and bolts, and eye hooks twisting, dancing and popping to a soothing electronica beat.

Luminaris (Argentina, Juan Pablo Zaramella, 2010, 6.5 min)
In a world controlled and timed by light, one man has a plan that could change destiny.

The Maker (Australia, Christopher Kezelos, 2010, 5 min)
In a dark room, a glass-eyed puppet is constructing a look-alike companion; he completes the puppet but she doesn't come alive. At last her eyes open and they share a few brief moments of togetherness.

Maximum Boost (Switzerland, Rolf Hellat, 2010, 5 min)
With inventive use of sound, including crackly original audio from the Apollo 13 space mission, Remo and his grandmother blast off from a rainy playground in Switzerland on a journey to the moon.

The Storyteller (India/UK, Nandita Jain, 2011, 10 min)
Nirmala lives in a seaside village with her grandpa, who recites her favorite story about a fisher boy. Yet lately he’s been forgetting some of the details.


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10th




















Magic Piano with various musically inclined animated shorts
When: Saturday, November 10th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater
Cost:
Free with Museum admission
Showtime 11 am

From the Academy Award-winning producer of Peter and the Wolf, and set to Chopin’s etudes in celebration of the 200th anniversary of his birth, The Magic Piano is a soaring tale of a girl who takes off into the open skies and travels the globe on a flying piano in search of her father. Other musical animation in the program includes Little Postman, pl.ink!, and Night Island, also from theFlying Machine series, as well as the award-winning musical films Luminaris and The Maker.

Total runtime, 60 min.  Recommended for ages 3 and up.


Toys in the Attic
When: Saturday, November 10th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater
Cost:
Free with Museum admission
Showtime 1 pm

Legendary Czech stop-motion animator Jiri Barta’s first feature in over 20 years is four parts Toy Story and one part David Lynch, as a group of abandoned toys stage an ambitious rescue of their kidnapped friend.  Set behind the doors of a dusty attic, the adorable doll Buttercup plays mom to a motley family of castaways: the station master Teddy Bear, clay-animated Schubert, and the Quixotic marionette knight Sir Handsome. In this enchanted world every day is a birthday, until a mysterious black cat kidnaps the beloved Buttercup and takes her to the Land of Evil ruled by the villainous Head of State, who commands an army of mechanical, mustachioed insects and an all seeing spying eye. Both a wonderfully spooky children’s fairy tale and Soviet-era allegory, Toys in the Attic marks a career highpoint for Barta. New English language dub features the voices of Forest Whitaker, Joan Cusack and Cary Elwes.

Screens with the short film Twist and Shout. Total runtime, 78 min. Recommended for ages 7 and up.


Salaam Dunk
When: Saturday, November 10th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater
Cost:
Free with Museum admission
Showtime 3 pm

This thoroughly charming and eye-opening sports doc offers a glimpse of hope and possibility for life in Iraq through the vantage point of a girls college basketball team. In its second year of existence, the American University of Iraq women’s team has never won a single game – not surprising in a culture where team sports are strictly for men and when most of the players have never touched a basketball (some even show up to tryouts in high heels!). Yet what they lack in talent they make up for in spunk, executing every drill and taking every direction from Connecticut English teacher-turned coach Ryan, whose earnestness sometimes plays like parody as he rallies his motley but endearing group into game shape. Through interviews and homemade video diaries, team members share their experiences before leaving war-torn homes and finding refuge at the university, where Kurds, Sunnis, Christians and Shiites are all welcome.

Screens with the short film The Girl and the Fox. Total runtime, 89 min.  Recommended for ages 9 and up.

*Note:  Please arrive early to enjoy the Exploratorium prior to the screening.  The Exploratorium closes at 5pm.


Letter to Momo
When: Saturday, November 10th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater
Cost:
Free with Museum admission
Showtime 5 pm

The last time Momo saw her father they had a fight – and now all she has left to remember him is an incomplete letter that he had started to write her, a blank piece of paper penned with the words “Dear Momo” but nothing more. Moving with her mother from bustling Tokyo to the remote Japanese island of Shio, she soon discovers three goblins living in her attic, assigned to watch over her.  The perpetually starving goblins begin to wreak havoc on the formerly tranquil island, ransacking pantries and ravaging orchards – acts for which Momo often has to take the blame. But these funny monsters also have a serious side, and may hold the key to helping Momo understand what her father had been trying to tell her. The animation is superb throughout, from the painstakingly rendered serenity of the island’s Shinto shrines to the climactic finale – a frantic chase featuring thousands of squirming, morphing ghosts and goblins that is the best flight of supernatural fancy since Spirited Away.

Screens with the short film Dawn.  Total runtime, 122 min. Recommended for ages 7 and up.

*Note:  Please arrive early to enjoy the Exploratorium prior to this screening.  The Exploratorium closes at 5pm; exhibits will not be available following the screening.



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11th, 2012


Kid Flix Mix
When: Sunday, November 11th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater
Cost:
Free with Museum admission
Showtime 11 am
Enjoy a colorful collection of short films from around the world, hand-picked as audience and jury favorites from the 2012 New York Int’l Children’s Film Festival. Recommended for ages 4 up. Total runtime, 60 min.  In English or musical/no dialogue. Includes:

B/W Races (Italy, Jacopo Martinoni, 2010, 2.5 min)
A quirky, black and white paper cut-out animation about a car race – in which a rogue black driver who runs others off the track gets his comeuppance. Home-made sound-effects add to the lo-fi fun.

Balloon Moon (Portugal, Jose Miguel Ribeiro, 2010, 5 min)
With sumptuous colors and artful stop motion animation, a cardboard boy and his ladybug friend set sail into a deep blue moonlit sea and have a dream adventure.

Behind (Canada, Ga Young Back, 2011, 3 min)
After a trying and scary day, a little girl feels all alone – until she realizes that her best friend has been with her and taking care of her the whole time.

Diversity (USA, Anthony Dusko, 2010, 1 min)
This instructive cartoon teaches important lessons of life, like how to do the happy dance.

Ernesto (UK, Corinne Ladeinde, 2011, 7 min)
Seven-year-old Ernesto feels left out when he realizes he's the only kid in school who hasn’t lost any baby teeth. Ernesto resorts to drastic measures to get rid of them; his teeth however, have other plans...

The Gruffalo's Child (UK, Animation, Johannes Weiland/Uwe Heidschotter, 2011, 26 min)
One wild and windy night, the Gruffalo's child ignores her father's warning and tiptoes out into the snow in search of the Big Bad Mouse. This follow-up to the Oscar-nominated original is adapted from the enormously popular Gruffalo picture books by British author Julia Donaldson.

Gulp (UK, Animation, Sumo Science, 2011, 2 min)
Aardman Animations and Sumo Science follow up last year’s wonderful diminutive Dot (which set the world record for smallest animated character) by notching it up a few orders of magnitude. Shot on an expansive seaside location, they set a new record for the world’s largest stop motion set, in this story of a fisherman who gets swallowed by a whale.

Keenan at Sea (USA, David Cowles/Jeremy Galante, 2010, 2 min)
This adorable tune from The Girls is the catchy theme song for the festival!

Metro (USA, Jake Wyatt, 2011, 5 min)
A young girl chases a mysterious fox through a secret door and into a subterranean wonderland to retrieve her stolen train ticket.

Twist & Shout (Japan, Yosuke Kihara, 2010, 3 min)
Two cute-as-buttons Japanese puppets travel to Abbey Road to find inspiration and shoot the video for their ukulele cover version of “Twist and Shout.”

Who is Not Sleeping? (Sweden, Jessica Lauren, 2010, 4 min)
Rabbit is sleeping over at Teddy Pig's house. It's going to be lots of fun! They are playing and drinking hot chocolate, but when the lights go out something doesn't feel quite right.


Magic Piano with various shorts
When: Sunday, November 11th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater
Cost:
Free with Museum admission
Showtime 1 pm

From the Academy Award-winning producer of Peter and the Wolf, and set to Chopin’s etudes in celebration of the 200th anniversary of his birth, The Magic Piano is a soaring tale of a girl who takes off into the open skies and travels the globe on a flying piano in search of her father. Other musical animation in the program includes Little Postman, pl.ink! and Night Island, also from theFlying Machine series, as well as the award-winning musical films Luminaris and The Maker.

Total runtime, 60 min.  Recommended for ages 3 and up.


Monster in Paris
When: Sunday, November 11th, 2012
Where: McBean Theater
Cost:
Free with Museum admission
Showtime 3 pm

Paris, 1910. The streets of the city are flooded. A mist-enshrouded Eiffel Tower looms over a temporary lake and the alleyways sport makeshift bridges so Parisians can go about their daily routines. But spirits are high for the citizens of this romantic city, including those of Emile, a lovelorn film projectionist, and his inventor friend Raoul, whose enthusiasm for breaking rules places him and Emile at the center of some unintentional mischief after they sneak into a scientist’s laboratory greenhouse and unwittingly let loose a monster onto the soggy streets of Paris.

Yet this terrible monster turns out to have a sad and sensitive soul – as well as musical talent – and when cabaret singer Lucille discovers the beast hiding backstage at the music hall, he dons a cape and hat and joins her act, instantly wowing the crowd with his silky smooth voice and hot guitar licks. Yet despite his peaceful demeanor, the City of Lights is in a panic, as the rotten rogue of a mayor plunges his police force headlong into a chaotic monster hunt that uses both the sweeping backdrops of Paris and 3D effects to the fullest. Songs by Sean Lennon.

Screens with the short film Keenan at Sea. Total runtime, 94 minutes.  Recommended for ages 7 and up.

*Note:  Please arrive early to enjoy the Exploratorium prior to this screening.  The Exploratorium closes at 5pm.

Hours of Operation & New Evening Hours
Tuesday-Sunday 10am-5pm;  every Thursday evening adults only (ages 18 and up) 6pm-10pm.

Admission
$25 for adults, with lower rates for SF Bay Area residents, youth, seniors, students, teachers and the disabled. Tickets available at the door and advance tickets available online at www.exploratorium.edu/visit/tickets.

Getting Here
The Exploratorium is easily accessible by public transit. Convenient parking is available nearby. For more information, visit www.exploratorium.edu/visit/location-directions

About the Exploratorium
The Exploratorium is the global leader in informal learning, igniting curiosity and inspiring creativity in people of all ages. The world-renowned science museum creates original, interactive exhibits, on display at more than 1,000 science centers, museums and public spaces around the world. Dedicated to education reform in and out of the classroom, the Exploratorium is a premier professional development center for educators and a creator of award-winning educational resources. Since 1969, the Exploratorium has influenced generations of entrepreneurs, artists, scientists, teachers, students, children, museum professionals and everyday doers, reaching nearly 180 million people annually from around the globe. On April 17, 2013, the Exploratorium opened at Pier 15 in the heart of San Francisco's Embarcadero, where it will celebrate a new era of experiences that encourage critical thinking and awaken wonder for generations to come. For more information, visit www.exploratorium.edu/visit.

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www.exploratorium.edu

Contact Us:
Jenny Slafkosky (415) 528-4367