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Exploratorium Unveils New Mural-Sized Hubble Space Telescope Images

For Immediate Release:
April 01, 2005

Media Available
Contact:
Jenny Slafkosky (415) 528-4367
images@exploratorium.edu

Exploratorium Unveils New Mural-Sized Hubble Space Telescope Images

On Tuesday, April 26 at noon, the Exploratorium unveils two new mural-sized images taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope for the public. The stunning photographs of the well-known spiral galaxy M51 and an eerie-looking tower of gas in the Eagle Nebula commemorate Hubble’s 15 years of viewing the heavens. The images will be unveiled as part of the Exploratorium’s 15th anniversary Hubble Webcast at www.exploratorium.edu/hubble/live/webcasts.html, but the public is urged to come to the Exploratorium to see the large scale images first hand. During the webcast the two spectacular Hubble images will be unveiled and we’ll discuss Hubble's accomplishments over the past 15 years. The images will remain at the Exploratorium for at least one month.

The 4-foot-by-6-foot image of M51 reveals striking details of how clusters of stars are born in the galaxy’s long, curving spiral arms. The 3-foot-by-6-foot photograph of the Eagle Nebula shows a gaseous landscape sculpted by ultraviolet light from a group of massive, hot, young stars. These views are among the largest and sharpest images ever taken by the Hubble telescope. They show the awesome beauty of space.

The Earth-orbiting observatory was deployed in space on April 25, 1990. Hubble orbits above Earth’s murky atmosphere, which distorts light from celestial objects. During its 15 years of viewing the universe, the Hubble telescope has taken more than 700,000 snapshots of celestial objects such as galaxies, dying stars, and giant gas clouds, the birthplace of stars. The telescope gave the world a front-row seat to watch chunks of a comet slam into the giant planet Jupiter. Hubble also photographed galaxies that existed billions of years ago, when the universe was a youngster.

Additional information about the Hubble Space Telescope is available at http://hubblesite.org/.

Hours of Operation & New Evening Hours
Tuesday-Sunday 10am-5pm;  every Thursday evening adults only (ages 18 and up) 6pm-10pm.

Admission
$29 for adults, with lower rates for SF Bay Area residents, youth, seniors, students, teachers and the disabled. Tickets available at the door and advance tickets available online at www.exploratorium.edu/visit/tickets.

Getting Here
The Exploratorium is easily accessible by public transit. Convenient parking is available nearby. For more information, visit www.exploratorium.edu/visit/location-directions

About the Exploratorium
The Exploratorium is the global leader in informal learning, igniting curiosity and inspiring creativity in people of all ages. The world-renowned science museum creates original, interactive exhibits, on display at more than 1,000 science centers, museums and public spaces around the world. Dedicated to education reform in and out of the classroom, the Exploratorium is a premier professional development center for educators and a creator of award-winning educational resources. Since 1969, the Exploratorium has influenced generations of entrepreneurs, artists, scientists, teachers, students, children, museum professionals and everyday doers, reaching nearly 180 million people annually from around the globe. On April 17, 2013, the Exploratorium opened at Pier 15 in the heart of San Francisco's Embarcadero, where it will celebrate a new era of experiences that encourage critical thinking and awaken wonder for generations to come. For more information, visit www.exploratorium.edu/visit.

Exploratorium
Pier 15
San Francisco
California 94111
(415) 528-4444 telephone
media@exploratorium.edu
www.exploratorium.edu

Contact Us:
Jenny Slafkosky (415) 528-4367