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Running Time:
01:45:00
In 1991, using powerful magnets and “sewer pipe, wire, epoxy, and finger tapping,”* a few research groups converged on the idea of utilizing the magnetic resonance properties of gray matter to image the active, thinking human brain—what the world now knows as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Since then, cognitive neuroscience has developed apace, with an explosion of ingenious techniques and sophisticated tools. Each new advance is greeted with a chorus of scholarly and popular speculation on its potential application to other arenas of human endeavor. Discussions about the ‘promise of neuroscience’ are often tinged with a mixture of hope and fear. Nowhere is this ambivalence more evident than in the courts, as conjecture runs rampant about the legal impact of this research, stoked by claims that neuroscience may soon detect liars, objectively determine criminal responsibility, quantify suffering, and predict violence. But is neuroscience ready for courtroom use? Does brain imaging permit us to measure a person’s feelings, thoughts, and intentions? Can jurors understand and effectively weigh neuroscientific evidence? Please join host David Faigman along with Dr. Kent Kiehl of the University of New Mexico and Professor Amanda Pustilnik of the University of Maryland and Harvard University to discuss the fascinating and wide-ranging challenges posed by the use of contemporary neuroscience in the courtroom.

Project: In the Balance: Bringing Science to Justice with David Faigman | Browse All

Date: May 26, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): General Science
Running Time:
00:20:00
Join Paul Stepahin for a presentation about quantum mechanics and the elements.Boron is complicated. Elusive. Tough. Created in collisions between cosmic rays and interstellar dust, pure boron may be found in meteoroids, but not naturally on Earth. And yet this relatively uncommon element is essential for plant growth, and readily appears in compounds such as borax, famously conveyed by 20-mule teams across Death Valley. A brittle metalloid, boron behaves somewhat like a metal, somewhat like a non-metal. It can be reactive or unreactive. Crystalline or powdered. It can shift from three to four atomic bonds. Imagine boron as elemental spy: enigmatic except in its useful effects.

Project: Everything Matters: Tales from the Periodic Table | Browse All

Date: May 24, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): General Science
Running Time:
00:30:00
Follow the trail of this intriguing element through ceramics, cleaning agents, fireworks, nuclear reactors, and nanotubes. Get a primer on quantum mechanics, play with slime, and see live flameworking with Russell Taylor of Public Glass.

Project: Everything Matters: Tales from the Periodic Table | Browse All

Date: May 23, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): General Science, Physics, Chemistry
Running Time:
00:30:00
Join Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty for a update on the Rosetta Mission, the Philae lander, and Comet 67P. See the latest images and learn about the information gathered thus far!

Project: Rosetta Mission | Browse All

Date: May 15, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): Astronomy/Space Science
Running Time:
00:30:00
Robots have gone where no one has gone before and sent back photographs of things never before seen. Witness robot-captured photos of hellaciously hot venus, cryogenically cold Titan, and many places in between. Join Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty to a brief exploration of the images that have captured our imaginations.

Project: After Dark | Browse All

Date: May 12, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): Art, Astronomy/Space Science
Running Time:
00:20:00
As cameras became more sophisticated, so too did our understanding of projective geometry. In this brief talk, we’ll explore how the art of photography has helped reveal the elegant mathematics of vision.

Project: After Dark | Browse All

Date: May 12, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): Art, General Science
Running Time:
00:30:00
We are thrilled to host Hubble Imaging expert, Zolt Levay, from the Space Telescope Institute for a discussion about the science and art of translating Hubble's data into colorful photographs of the cosmic landscape.

Project: After Dark | Browse All

Date: May 7, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): Art Astronomy/Space Science
Running Time:
00:20:00
5 years and 5 servicing missions have provided scientists and the public with unprecedented views of our universe. From objects as close as our solar system to the furthest reaches of the Universe, we’ll look at some of these images and discuss what it took to get them.

Project: Miscellaneous | Browse All

Date: April 30, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): Astronomy/Space Science
Running Time:
01:43:00
“They Say They Want to Bring Me in Guilty”: On the Need to Make Forensic Identification 'Science' Scientific

Project: In the Balance: Bringing Science to Justice with David Faigman | Browse All

Date: April 2, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): general science
Running Time:
00:25:00
Behold beryllium, an exceptionally light, strong metal that is both prized and poisonous. Found in minerals such as emeralds and other forms of beryl, beryllium is highly conductive to heat and electricity, nonmagnetic, capable of great elasticity, and impervious to a wide range of temperatures, making it a favored material for aerospace projects such as space shuttles and satellites. In this video you will discover the element’s ancient and atomic histories with host Ron Hipschman!

Project: Everything Matters: Tales from the Periodic Table | Browse All

Date: March 20, 2015
Format: Lecture
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): Chemistry, Geology/Earth Science